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Archikulture Digest

by Carl F Gauze

Archive for March, 2010

Theatre Downtown’s 21st Birthday Bash

Sunday, March 28th, 2010

Theatre Downtown’s 21st Birthday Bash
Directed by Kevin Bee, Tim DeBaun, Fran and Frank Hilgenberg, and Steve MacKinnon
Theatre Downtown, Orlando Fl

For more than two decades, Theatre Downtown has been a stalwart of the local theater scene. Sure, the Hilgenberg’s tend to like plays about baseball and Tennessee Williams, but they also gave us David Lindsay-Albaire and Charles Busch and Del Shores. They also did the most amazing play I’ve ever seen, Patrick Meyers’ mountain climbing epic “K2.” If you know where to look, you can still see the bolt holes in the ceiling. Tonight we recap some of those great moments with scenes and songs from previous shows, often as not with the original cast.

The opening number sort of sneaks up on you as Frank Hilgenberg’s famous curtain speech is missing. Emily Patterson, Jessica Hondel and Victoria Burns sing “Home” from “The Wiz” and while the audio is a bit off, the audience’s attention is now properly focused. The second scene features Frank Hilgenberg and James Zelly doing Mamet’s “American Buffalo”, the first show ever performed by Theatre Downtown. I can say I was there, although not in a professional capacity. Now we run through a quick refresher on American Theater : Atticus Finch explains racism and rape to his daughter Scout, Jim Cassidy does a wonderfully mush-mouthed Big Daddy from “Cat On A Hot Tin Roof”, James Zelly returns to beg for his job in “Death of a Salesman,” there’s a three way with Jenn Gannon, Tommy Keesling and Marion Marsh from “Tale Of The Allergists Wife”, a medley form “Little Shop of Horrors” with Steven Pugh reprising his demented dentist role, and Adam DelMedico and Scott Poole discuss the possibility of actual sex with an actual woman from “Biloxi Blues.”

After the intermission there’s a nice little documentary on the history of the theater from the folks at Poison Coyote Video. Over the years the building was a car dealership, a packing house and an appliance store before (Yes, I bought my first air conditioner there in 1982.) In the early days there was no air conditioning in the theatre, and donations were collected to cool the stage. Naturally, there’s a ghost, supposedly that of Edgar Allen Poe, but its unclear why he isn’t haunting Baltimore instead of Central Florida. More snippets follow from “Vampire Lesbians of Sodom”, “Rocky Horror Show” and the devil comes out of the woodwork to repose a soul in the “Seafarer.” It’s amazing how many productions Theatre downtown has put up, and that doesn’t count the dozens of other production companies and readings and workshops that have used their space. Theatre Downtown has produced hundreds of high quality shows over the years, and we all hope that can carry on for a few more decades. To quote Frank Hilgenberg: “I’ll see YOU at the show!”

For more information on Theatre Downtown, please visit http://www.theatredowntown.net

Tilikunundrum

Sunday, March 28th, 2010

Tilikunundrum
Brian Feldman Projects
March 27, 2010
SeaHouse(R) Orlando, Orlando FL

On a perfect yard sale morning, I headed over to the last frontier of College Park, right up to the edge of that crumbling wooden fence that marks the last vestiges of Middle Class Orlando. On the other side lies the Orlando Country Club, and a bit to the left we see the first ominous harbingers of Pine Hills. In this unlikely location we find one of Orlando’s newest and least known tourist attractions: “SeaHouse(R) Orlando.” Set in a rambling 1950 ranch, the attraction is a tiny bathroom with Brian Feldman doing what he does best – holding nearly still for hours on end in service to the highest concept art in town. He must have been a wonderful child in school.

So what is Feldman conceptualizing today? A few weeks ago, the orca Tilikum killed his trainer in full sight of the public at SeaWorld(R). (SeaWorld(R) is in no way associated with or endorsed by SeaHouse(R) Orlando.) A debate rages over what to do with the whale and whether whales should be held in captivity at all. One group thinks the whale should be euthanized, just to teach the animal kingdom a lesson. The details of the death are unimportant today, SeaWorld(R) is open for business and the whale show is a bigger hit than before. The deceased young woman may be the modern day Howard Beale – her death improved the ratings, and that’s all that counts.

I came back at 11:50 to catch the end of the show. There was a small light on in the kitchen, but SeaHouse(R) Orlando was dark and I was reluctant to knock on a stranger’s door at midnight. I assume Feldman was wrinkled but safe, and ready to tackle another existentialist project in a few days. As to Tilikum, he’ll probably remain in his tank on I-Drive, and another dedicated and skilled trainer working for minimal wage will jump into the tank for a weekly paycheck. Blood sells tickets, even the Romans knew this.

For more information on SeaHouse(R) Orlando, please visit www.BrianFeldmancom.

Pollock: The Project

Sunday, March 28th, 2010

Pollock: The Project
Concept by Beth Marshall
Written and directed by John Didonna
With Special guests DRIP
Beth Marshall Productions
Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando FL

Art is what you can get away with, and when the camera became commonplace, the Artiste had to switch gears from “making it LOOK real” to “making it FEEL real.” By WW2, the American art scene had given up on reality and took to throwing random blobs of paint on the canvas and defining art rather than letting the consumer define it. Using the words “random” or “chaotic” might get you a poke in the face or called “hopelessly out of touch” but the dripping, splattered work Pollock created has a certain charm. If nothing else, the thought “I could do that” really has some truth to it, as we see by the end of the evening.

In this mixed media event, the Mennello Museum of American Art serves as the backdrop for a flashbulb insight into the life and art of Jackson Pollock (John DiDonna). Dusk approached and the sky clouded but a group of 40 artists and patrons accumulates under a wobbly looking structure with a sheet of Plexiglas set atop it. Local dance company DRIP climbed ladders as dissonant Jazz and audio quotes from Pollock blare from speakers. As patrons look on, the dancers paint a black and white drip-style work on the plastic. Orbiting the event is an angry Jackson Pollock, chain smoking and glaring without making eye contact. The DRIP dancers don’t just paint; they wave the cans of paint and brushes ritualistically over the surface, recalling a priest blessing the communion host. Applying paint is not the point here, it’s the motion.

As the dancers withdraw, we are invited into the galley. The Mennello has snagged two small and dense drip-period paintings, and while the crowd is encouraged to deport itself at will, I was chastened by the host: “Please don’t block the Pollocks.” We transport to 1950 and the gallery becomes Pollock’s Studio on Long Island. His wife and fellow Artist Lee Krasner (Jen Bonner) greets German photographer Hans Namuth (Douglas McGeoch). Namuth has come to photograph Pollock at work, not so much because Pollock sought him but because Krasner recognized the importance of publicity. Pollock was cranky and a heavy drinker and the visit prompts an argument that is carried out in the lobby of museum. We stay with Namuth, who apologizes profusely, realizing he’s in the presence of an artist as great as himself. Pollock bends a bit and explains his work, demanding that it’s NOT an accidental but intentional. He can demonstrate this, and we return to the front step of the Mennello for the evidence. There DiDonna demonstrates the technique, creating a replica Pollock in black, white, and rust acrylic. I’ll give him this – DiDonna’s effort was not substantially worse than other forgeries I’ve seen.

DiDonna contemplates the visual texture of his work.

So what do all these blobs of paint mean? Whatever we want them to. Like theater, painting mixes the intention of an artist with the by the interpretation of an audience. But behind the canvas or the curtain the people creating the art may well be much more dramatic than the art itself. DiDonna’s portrayal was powerful and occasionally scary, and while Bonner’s Brooklyn accent fluctuated, she appeared the sensible one in the house, and had the marketing savvy to turn her husband into a pop star. That stardom probably killed him, but that’s the price of fame.

Life is transient, but art persists and tomorrow is another show. DiDonna noticed some unacceptable “figurative images” in tonight’s painting, and they must be expurgated. That experience belongs to the next crowd who are defined as incrementally hipper. That’s how it all works: tonight’s revelations will jade by the mornings light, but a new trend is on the horizon – can you catch it before everyone else?

For more information, please visit http://www.mennellomuseum.com/

The Best of Broadway 2000-2009

Monday, March 22nd, 2010

The Best of Broadway 2000-2009
Directed by Wade Hair
Breakthrough Theatre, Winter Park, FL

While opera might be stuck in a Verde-Rossini-Puccini time warp, the American Musical Theatre continues to crank out exciting shows with innovation sound and story. This comprehensive review covers the last decade of new shows and Broadway revivals, pulling out the gems and even a few lesser lights. We open with the obvious: “Another Opening, Another Night” from the 2000 revival of “Kiss Me Kate.” It gets the whole cast on the cramped stage, but no one trips and we’re on our way. The AM radio pop sound is always popular, and “Run Around Sue”, “Mama I’m A Big Girl Now” and “My Boyfriend’s Back” filled that slot. Some of the more challenging tunes include “My Husband Makes Movies” from “Nine”, two tunes from “Assassins” and the Sondheim penned “The Children Will Listen” from “Into The Woods.”

Vocally, director Wade Hair sang some the big winners including the Act One closer “I Am What I Am” from “La Cage aux Folles” Kate O’Neil came out with a young mop-headed Matt Dutton for a Billy Elliot number, and “The Song That Goes Like This” was my favorite, sung by Lucy Yarborough and Ian Clark, although “When You Got It, Flaunt it” by Krystal Gillette came dangerously close to an on stage wardrobe failure.

Production values were a bit wobbly. While there were great costumes for every scene and decent choreography, scene changes distracted. Occasionally the cast moved the rehearsal cubes about, but ever so often the sound guy rushed up though the audience to help. That in itself was not a problem, but his very untheatrical camouflage jacket jarred with the rest of the more conventionally dressed cast. While you don’t absolutely have to wear black to move stuff on stage, this is really the first time I’ve seen this tradition violated. Still, the singing was great even if the backing track was recorded, and the sheer number of bodies crammed on stage made the audio clear thought the room. Its nice review, well presented and well attended.

For more information, please visit http://www.breakthroughtheatre.com

Superior Donuts

Monday, March 22nd, 2010

Superior Donuts
By Tracy Letts
Directed by Rob Anderson
Starring Michael Sapp and Sam Hazell
Mad Cow Theatre, Orlando, FL

Chicago is full of tough guys and tough names. Arthur Przybyszewski (Hazell) is only tough in name – he fled to Canada to avoid Viet Nam, thus disgracing his immigrant family and losing the love of his father. Jimmy Carter let him back into the USA, but then his wife left him. Now he’s alone with a sad stash of pot and a failing business in a decaying neighborhood. On good days he makes “deep fried dessert cakes” (donuts to the rest of us) and even sells a few. The shop has the charm of the DMV, and his Russian immigrant neighbor Max (Joe Wyatt) sticks up for him better than he does for himself. When he hires the young hustler Franco (Sapp) he’s deluged with obvious suggestions on how to grow his revenue and maximize his leverage – play some music, stay open later, try to keep donuts and coffee in stock at all times. Good advice, but not where his life is heading. He’s surrounded by opportunity but ignores it as hard as he can. Heck, even the cops are on his side, horny Officer Osteen (Marty Stonerock) is sweet on him and comes complete with her own hockey tickets. It takes Franco lying mangled in the hospital to get him off his hippy dippy butt and doing something positive with his life.

Not a bad story, but it’s the acting that makes “Superior Donuts” so much better than those Krispy Kreme’s everyone used to stand in line for. The funniest stuff goes to Wyatt’s Russian buddy Max – he spits venom and dead pan humor like an AK-47, trying to understand why America is so wonderful and so screwed up at the same. Sapp and Hazel have a resonant chemistry; they are a father and son, each seeking their counterpart. Sapp’s comedy reaches its peak as he learns the mystic art of frying dough, and Hazell’s fight to the death with bookie Luther (Steven Jones) shows he really cares about the boy. Jones’s creepiness fluctuates from mobster tough to desperate milk junkie, but his supposed Southside accent sounds a bit more like Winnetka to my Midwestern ears. The supporting roles were well cast with Joe Coffey as the psycho enforcer scaring the folks in the front row, and Marty Stonerock and Paris Crayton III as the police partners who hated each other. When Crayton appeared in a red Star Trek shirt, I was pretty sure he wouldn’t return for the curtain.

“Superior Donuts” careens down the Dan Ryan with nonstop humor and action. Cindy White’s set just needs the smell of stale peanut oil to complete the Chicago experience, and overhead train noises slide in and out as Arthur flashes back to explain his life of running away from problems. Steven Jones stages a nice fight scene with the winning blow delivered by an ulcer. Sapp’s humor nearly matches that of Wyatt, but let’s face it – how can you top lines like “he stuck his finger in the wrong asshole”? The Disney-grade platitudes about “believing in yourself” and “following your dreams” might survive in the suburbs, but down here under the El the world belongs to those who make their own luck.

For more information on Mad Cow, please visit http://www.madcowtheatre.com

Shotgun

Sunday, March 21st, 2010

Shotgun
By John Biguenet
Directs by David Karl Lee
Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, Orlando, FL

When your city washes away with the rest of your life, there are compromises to be made. Hurricane Katrina left the very white Beau (Rus Blackwell) and his son Eugene (Brandon Peters) homeless to the point of renting half a shotgun house on the wrong side of the river. That’s where things are even worse -blacks are so desperate they must rent to whites. The good news is Beau is a credit to his race – trustworthy, pays his rent on time, he only sings depressing hillbilly songs on Sunday mornings. His landlady Mattie (Chantal Jean-Pierre) takes a shine to him and brings him a buttermilk pie even though Eugene, her father Dexter (Dennis Neal) and her ex Willie (Barry White) do NOT think this a healthy friendship. Friendship is the least of their worries, miscegenation is in the air but nothing they can do will stop it. Beau is hung in the past; he takes responsibility for the death of his wife. She drown when the levee broke and half the town figured out what “below sea level” really means. Things stay static until Dex takes Eugene aside and teaches him how to leverage his efforts to get what he wants – a return to his home, or what’s left of it. The Dex/Eugene plot succeeds: Eugene learns how to get his way without whining, Willie gets a real job, and Dexter keeps his principles pure even if he’s still sleeping on a bedrock hard couch in the front room.

Blazing acting and a spectacular set paper over some oddities in this subtle and realistic story. It’s hard to point fingers at who trumps who – Neal mixes Red Foxx racism with the practiced art of manipulating everyone he touches. His mix of guilt, bluster, and righteous indignation at how life has treated him controls everyone except Beau. He also gets all the laughs. Blackwell’s Beau is the most pleasant, self-effacing, hard worker you ever meet, yet he tortures himself with guilt over things that no one could realistically prevent. His monologue about the death of his wife at the end of the first act will break your heart, and point out why an axe in the attic is a good idea. Jean-Pierre as Mattie is every bit as lonely as Beau, yet she looks forward rather than back – she even teaches Beau to cook, and that’s a vote of confidence from a woman if ever I saw one. Barry White is the classic glad-handing conniver, flattering and preening and looking for the unlocked door or extra plate at dinner. When his change comes, it’s quick and unexpected, and not completely believable. Even newcomer Brandon Peters was impressive as the rebel with a cause as he worries endlessly about acceptance and getting beat up as the only white boy in a 5A high school. His knife dance with this father showed his mastery of teen hormonal rage.

The set by Bob Phillips and his crew showed the continuing mechanical ingenuity of Orlando Shakespeare set designs. Arranged like a pair of bi fold doors, a clever mechanism quickly switched between a turn of the century front porch and a shabby kitchen with nary a black clad stage hand to be seen. The very real looking set complimented the very real story, and that’s my oddball complaint: nearly everybody acted as normally as possible in the circumstances, giving “Shotgun” a kitchen sink dramatic feel. Without exception, all the characters did completely realistic things – there were no obviously bad decisions, no hyper reality, and the Chekhovian knife presaged nothing. They just simple reacted to the disaster and loss, some moving forward, some stranded like a Honda on the roof after the flood receded. Disasters are everywhere, and sometimes all you can do is bury the dead, fill out the paperwork, rail at Gods and Governments and start pounding nails. Work WILL set you free, or at least push you into whatever new world lies ahead.

For more information on Orlando Shakespeare Theater, visit http://www.orlandoshakes.org

sleepwalk 2: i walk over you

Sunday, March 21st, 2010

sleepwalk 2: i walk over you
Performed by Brian Feldman
Outsider Art Fair at the Frames Forever & Art Gallery, Winter Park, FL
March 20, 2010

As Brian Feldman grows more sucessful in his role as Orlando’s only real surrealist, he’s adopting a more traditional eight hour day. Lasts year’s two day marathon of sleeping in public now shrinks to a single eight hour event and lacks the cadre of helpful volunteers to watch over him as the bars close and the cops start asking hard questions. This version of “Sleepwalk” inverts the original concept – while last year’s challenge was to get random civilians to walk OVER a snoozing Feldman, this year’s twist was to have them walk UNDER a somnambulant Feldman. Interestingly, this proved a greater challenge.

High above the streets of Winter Park Brian Feldman is on patrol

A 10 foot construction scaffold rose in front of the “Frames Forever” gallery, a sort of tree house for a land with no trees. Feldman appeared in his fuzzy blue PJ’s with the sno-globe motif at 11 a.m. and clambered up to the platform. He wore a matching blue Hollywood sleep mask, and in this Time Constrained Performance he shuffled back and forth on his platform like a zombie in search of a midnight snack. Occasionally, people walked under him while the song “Sleepwalk” by Santos and Johnny played over and over annoying the other Outsider artists. Was this art? He says so, and who would know better?

The Oustsider Art Festival drew patrons from throughout the galaxy.

By three in the afternoon, his walkunders sign-in board held perhaps twenty signatures. In the “Frames Forever” parking lot even more arty events transpired. Doug Rhodehamel crafted a pile of paper bag mushrooms and plugged his “Spore” project. Local sketch artist Thomas Thorspecken documented the day, and a number of artists painted and schmoozed and drank beer from a keg or gin from a hip flask. Buffalo quail Wings were sold, and the reported taste was “Chicken, with a touch of frog.” I passed. Occasional lost Winter Park Art Festival aficionados wandered into the party. Feldman shuffled on and on as the first really warm day of 2010 baked his sun screened bald spot. I had other obligations, but returned just prior to the 7:00 pm wrap up.

By 7 pm, there were about 40 signatures on his board and the other artists were striking their booths. Without the support staff of prior events to explain the event, few civilians had walked under the scaffold or signed the board. While the reported should never interfere in the event, I took the reasonability to tell Feldman it was time to quit. He immediately lay down and went to sleep. I hope the dehydration wasn’t too bad.

Brian Feldman sleeps off another hard day of Art.

An hour later I drove past the Outsider Art Fair and Feldman was still in the pose I left him in at 7, but by 10 pm the scaffold was gone as was he. The Winter Park Art fest continued on with hundreds of serious crafters selling arty earrings, odd looking glass dust collectors, the occasional representation oil or ironically self-referential three dimensional mixed media collage. At the Outsider Art Fair the commerce was slower but the parking easier. Most of the visitors knew one another – I discussed a recent reading with a budding playwright, a fellow blogger asked if I was going to fill in for a retired competitor, and Feldman detailed the mechanics of an upcoming project. Art was made, but consumed principally by other artists. The food truck left early and disappointed but the beer held out till sunset. Art beats commerce, two falls out of three, and Art goes on to the semi-finals.

For more information on some of the participants of The OutSsder Art Festival, please visit the following links:
http://www.brianfeldman.com/
http://www.framesforever.com/
http://thorspecken.blogspot.com/
http://dougrhodehamel.wordpress.com/

Laboy & Bailey Circus

Monday, March 15th, 2010

Laboy & Bailey Circus
FranSean Productions
Breakthrough Theatre, Winter Park, FL

These days all the odd little experimental shows are popping up in the compact Breakthrough Theater. Tonight Orlando Fringe Veteran and notorious Puerto Rican Francisco Laboy teams up with standup comic Sean Bailey to provide an eclectic and uneven evening of improv, rap, sketch and standup comedy. They open with an improv game – they’ll tell us about Cinderella while juggling. The gimmick is they need to tell the story before they drop the balls three times before the “happily ever after,” but we never got as far as meeting Prince Charming. After a rather obscure “Bus sketch,” Laboy provided a rap number about Windows Vista that really hit the mark – while he may only be a light tan; he does have a knack for hip-hop. A few awkward improv games pulled some audience members on stage, but left everyone feeling a bit creeped out until Laboy came out as the roommate/pet dog of Mr. Bailey and pulled a few genuine laughs. Bailey’s following standup routine had some laughs as well, but he used a clip board with notes which spoiled the effect.

While not everything worked, the highlights made up for the weaknesses. Songs about masturbations were surprisingly funny, as were the bilingual soap opera that one woman in the audience understood perfectly and a final Air Cowbell number. The improv segments often as not fell flat, and both stand up routines focused on babies and child birth and covered the same ground, and the audience intervention segment telling Bailey he was a douchebag was especially awkward. Hopefully these guys can use the small space to edit and polish their routines. Come prepared to laugh, but be prepared to take breaks between those laughs.

For more information, please visit http://www.breakthroughtheatre.com
For more information on Laboy & Bailey, please see facebook.com/laboyandbaileycircus

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)

Monday, March 15th, 2010

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)
By Adam Long, Daniel Singer & Jess Winfield
Directed by Richard Width
The Garden Theatre, Winter Garden FL

The bard wrote 884,647 words on 118,406 lines, so clearly something has to be cut. The editing will be tough – even with “King John” and “Coriolanus” and all the out-of-date fart jokes are off the table, only real pros can strip out that single hour’s worth good jokes from this near-biblical canon of English literature. That job falls to GAS (Garden Abridged Shakespeare), lead by the hugely funny Jay Hopkins. Assisting him is the energetic Will Hagaman and the impetuous Chris Pruett, and they begin by dismembering “Romeo And Juliet”. The faux balcony in the Garden Theatre begs for this treatment, and Hagaman get to make that long climb while Hopkins Friar offers the advice “Drugs are great. Take lots of them.” It’s the only good advice the young lovers get in the whole play, and when Romeo dies, Juliet admits today was an “Icky poo poo wee wee day.”

The GAS guys don’t have time to go over every single couplet, but they pass around a sheet of sonnets and give us “Titus Andronicus” as a cable TV cooking show, “Othello” as a Hip Hop number, and all the Henry’s as college football game. The jokes are fast and furious, and a constant stream of contemporary updates keeps the script fresh – “Avatar” jokes and political reference fly over your head, and if one gag fails the next hits hard. The entire second act is devoted to Hamlet, which Pruitt refuses to play, claiming it has “too many words”. Well, yes, it’s like C-SPAN without the humor, but he relents and Hageman plays Gertrude with a vomiting problem, and Hopkins shows he can wield a sword as well as take one like a rat in the arris. With a small but chatty audience, this show worked harder than it should have to get laughs. Without close knowledge of Shakespeare, your still likely to have a wonderful time – the stale jokes are gone, and the comedies aren’t half as funny as the tragedies.

For a complete listing of events at The Garden Theatre in Winter garden, please visit http://wgtheater.org

Aunt Dottie’s Sing-Along Cabaret

Sunday, March 7th, 2010

Aunt Dottie’s Sing-Along Cabaret
Featuring Aunt Dottie and Nephew Erin
Breakthrough Theatre, Winter Park, FL

On cruise ships passing happily amongst tropical islands, entertainers like Aunt Dottie spend their days beneath decks and their evenings attempting to engage the passengers in safe, PG rated entertainment based old top 40 hits and silly stage antics. Tonight’s crowd was a bit tough, the folks at Breakthrough Theatre don’t have a liquor licenses and the crowd needed a few drinks to get up to full energy. Her concept is simple: Aunt Dottie is an experienced woman with a passion for sparkly eye shadow and ex husbands, while Nephew Erin plays the ivories and acts as her straight man. She’s between divorces, and he’s crashing on her the couch in the basement. It’s an interesting relation.

Tonight they’ve made the long drive from Washington State to Central Florida, and the house is packed. Chairs are set on stage to handle the overflow, and at least half the audience is a relative or ex-co-worker from a local amusement park. Each seat has a sheet of paper with her songs, the audience makes requests, and she belts out the music. Most of the songs require a volunteer from the audience, and they all receive a prize – either an autographed photo or a button featuring Dottie or Erin. It’s a fair trade and solid marketing. The audience was as entertaining as anything explicitly planned on stage: A short older gent gyrated to “Dancing Queen”, some little girls hula hooped to “Rockin’ Robin” and young woman up for “YMCA” became angry at her friend who refused to come up and dance with her.

Dottie’s vocals were fine for the material, although occasionally her shtick became tedious. Erin sang a pair of songs, apparently “you ALWAYS sing two songs” is part of the deal. His “Crocodile Rock” was a hit, and he took the drugs out of “Space Cowboy” to please Aunt D. The funniest song came from Dottie; she replaced the lyrics to “La Bamba” with dramatic readings from the menu of a local Mexican dive restaurant. It’s one of those silly things that just hit right tonight. Unlike the cabarets that appear in other local playhouses, this evening was not about virtuoso performance or the classic music of stage or film. This is simple, middle class comedy aimed at an audience that wants to be entertained, but not challenged. They loved it.

For more information, please visit http://www.breakthroughtheatre.com