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Papiroflexia

Folding thoughts since 1873

Jedi Squirrels

May 31st, 2007 by hcm

Squirrels with Lightsabers — ’nuff said.

The Sound Of No Keyboard Typing

May 17th, 2007 by hcm

Back in 2002, I went through this phase where I was coding chatbots — very limited programs which would aggravate and annoy you via AOL Instant Messenger. So I have particular admiration for Discover magazine and their act of pitting pitting two chatbots against each other, ALICE and Jabberwacky. I say the results are more than poetic:

A: Who is your favorite philosopher

J: Can’t say. I’m not very much into philosophy.

A: Can a book have no title?

J: Of course.

A: Blimey.

J: Are you British?

A: Does it seem like that? I was born in America.

J: You are definitely flirting!

It’s Official

May 17th, 2007 by hcm

Cue some Iggy Pop...

Tower Trio

May 16th, 2007 by hcm

Tower Trio, originally uploaded by HisCheapMoves.

Paper: Unknown 24lb. Flyer Paper (8.5″ x 11″)

I got a pack of about 100 sheets of five different types of “natural-toned” papers at an OfficeMax closeout. It was the house brand, so I don’t know who made it. The colors worked well for figures like these, makes them look carved.

These are cylinders. Each is made from a single sheet of paper, taped into a tube.

Corrugated Cooling Tower

May 14th, 2007 by hcm

Corrugated Cooling Tower, originally uploaded by HisCheapMoves.

Paper: Hammermill 24lb. Flyer (8.5″ x 11″)

This is made from a basic corrugated sheet. The paper is flattened, and the short sides are joined with a strip of tape. The folds are then set again. The tendency for the folds to expand flares out the top and bottom, resulting in what people at my office described as “those nuclear plant things.”

I trimmed the edges with an xacto prior to taping… the regular squared ends can be interesting too.

Aunts and Uncles

April 26th, 2007 by hcm

hovercraft23: I am not allowed to end a line of text with a word less than 4 letters.

hcm: According to?

hovercraft23: My boss.

hcm: Funny. < 4 or <= 4? hovercraft23: < 4 -- the, for, a, in, of, was. You know, most words. hcm: “fucker” is 6 letters, and you can always add it to the end of a sentence. [sentence], fucker.

hovercraft23: Right after the semicolon. Or em dash, which I also have to use now.

hcm: “You’ll get your results in a day, fucker.”

hovercraft23: This rule is tedious. “…of the new day.”

hcm: “deigh.”

hovercraft23: Yes! She says it was her mentor’s pet peeve.

hcm: So now it’s hers? Good mentoring there.

hovercraft23: Yes, arbitrary rules must be passed down

hcm: “An arbitrary rule based on spurious personal preference is the most important one, fucker.”

hovercraft23: Can’t start a line with a word less then 4 letters, either. It’s called an Aunt and the other is an Uncle

hcm: Jeebus

hovercraft23: Just kidding

hcm: No hyphenation?

hovercraft23: I don’t even wanna go there. I turn it off.

hovercraft23: There is a headline that says, “Had Enough yet?” — I am tempted to kick the Yet down to the next line.

hovercraft23: Had Enough

hovercraft23: Yet?

hcm: , Fucker?

hovercraft23: OK, I can’t laugh like this.

hovercraft23: Someone will walk in again.

All Our N-gram are Belong to You

April 10th, 2007 by hcm

I couldn’t come up with a better title for this than the one Google Research gave it… basically, they’re releasing word and phrase counts for their dataset of a trillion words. I dig it for many reasons — words are cool, that’s a lot of words, and making the data available to the public for insane linguistic research is so Google.

Deadly Kite Action

February 27th, 2007 by hcm

But it’s all in good fun! A traditional kite festival in Pakistan has resulted in 11 dead and 100 injured.  This massacre follows the reinstatement of the festival after 2005’s festival, the previously bloodiest wind outing ever.

Islamic Tessellations

February 23rd, 2007 by hcm

Because of a religious ban on the artistic representation of the world around us, a lot of early Islamic art tended to be of a geometric nature — intricate patterns of tile resulting in a heady mix of design, color and mathematics. As it turns out,
there is more to these patterns than meets the eye. One day, I’ll make it to the Alhambra and get to witness some of this stuff in person.

The Origamist

February 14th, 2007 by hcm

It’s interesting to read this profile of Robert J. Lang in a publication as high-profile as the New Yorker. He was featured in Discover a few months back, which I think is pretty big-time already, but its readership is nowhere as heterogeneous. It’s a good profile, and I recommend visiting Lang’s site if you’d like to see some of the models referenced in the article.